The Istanbul Convention: A Step Forward for Gender-Based Violence

Last Friday afternoon, the House of Commons passed a Private Members’ Bill by 135-2 committing the government to take further steps to ratify the Istanbul Convention, the ‘gold standard’ of gender violence legislation. Thanks to the tremendous work of volunteers at IC Change and the Women’s Equality Party, I watched from the public gallery as … More The Istanbul Convention: A Step Forward for Gender-Based Violence

The Case for Railway Renationalisation: What are we waiting for?

We are often told by staunch advocates of privatisation that it unleashes the dynamism, efficiency, and low-cost value which nationalised products can rarely match. Sometimes, this is true. But in the case of Britain’s railways, it most certainly is not. Putting aside the damning testimonies of numerous everyday passengers, famous or otherwise, the overall state … More The Case for Railway Renationalisation: What are we waiting for?

Andy Burnham Shows His Class in Greater Manchester Mayoral Hustings

During the Greater Manchester mayoral hustings on Tuesday evening, I watched three very impressive candidates battle it out to become Labour’s nominee for the 2017 race. Ivan Lewis, Tony Lloyd, and Andy Burnham all provided some promising responses to the issues that matter in Manchester; particularly over housing, transport, and health. It was Andy Burnham, … More Andy Burnham Shows His Class in Greater Manchester Mayoral Hustings

Labour Risks Trident Becoming its Defining Issue

In a tactfully orchestrated vote in the Commons yesterday, MPs voted overwhelmingly to renew the UK’s nuclear deterrent, Trident. Though shameful for the Government to play politics with national security, burgeoning divisions within Labour were brutally exposed as Jeremy Corbyn voted against the party’s official position of consent to trident renewal. Abstentions from Clive Lewis … More Labour Risks Trident Becoming its Defining Issue

Johnson, Gove and Farage are gone, but put the champagne on ice for now

In the rubble of post-Brexit Britain, Nigel Farage, Michael Gove, and Boris Johnson have all fallen on their sword despite emerging victorious just 15 days ago. Their inability to articulate a clear roadmap for life outside the EU, perhaps because none of them ever expected to win, has ultimately blunted their political ambitions, for now at … More Johnson, Gove and Farage are gone, but put the champagne on ice for now

Kicking the Establishment: A Case for Optimism

Leaving the EU does not fix Britain’s most fundamental and pressing problems, but it is a sign of the times. I wholeheartedly sympathise with the millions of Remainers waking up and posting angrily on Facebook about the prospects for a future Britain. In the immediate aftermath, it seems that a pseudo-xenophobic campaign has been vindicated, … More Kicking the Establishment: A Case for Optimism

Remembering Jo Cox: Lessons for the Future

Politicians, perhaps quite rightly, have a bad reputation. The expenses scandal, constant flip-flopping on issues, and just a widespread sense that they achieve very little, have done nothing to improve their public image. However, the murder of Jo Cox is a timely reminder – in the most tragic of circumstances – that politics still attracts … More Remembering Jo Cox: Lessons for the Future

Fair Judgement or Overstepping the Mark? The Bank of England and EU Referendum

Amidst all the furore over Brexit, an interesting side story has been developing over the last few months concerning the Bank of England, and not its coinage of new notes. Tory MP Jacob Rees-Mogg, affectionately known as the ‘Honourable Member for the early 20th Century’, has robustly criticised the Governor, Mark Carney, in a recent … More Fair Judgement or Overstepping the Mark? The Bank of England and EU Referendum